5 Best London Annual Events For Tourists

There are a number of things to see and do in London, such as visiting the zoo and the city’s museums and art galleries; however that may not be unique enough for some tourists, so here is a list of five events that happen in the capital city, but only once a year.

1. The London Marathon – One of the most famous marathons in the world, the London Marathon attracts over 500,000 spectators each year and is a unique event to witness. While there are a number of elite and world famous athletes, many people like to cheer on the runners that are doing the race a bit differently namely in fancy dress. With the Marathon raising thousands of pounds each year for charity, the London Marathon is one of the most charitable and exciting annual events to witness in London.

2. The Boat Race – Occurring in early March or April, the world famous boat race between Oxford and Cambridge Universities attracts huge crowds to see which of the two distinguished colleges will win. Each year over 250,000 people watch the race from the Thames river banks, but even more watch on TV with an estimated 450 million people watching all over the world. Tourists love the race, often enjoying a pub lunch and a few beers during the event. The race is a national institution having been held every year since 1829!

3. The Easter Parade – The parade was first held on Easter Monday1885 as an excuse for the rich and famous to show off their horses, but today the event is famous for its the wide range of vehicles that are on display, including old fashioned fire trucks and horse drawn carriages.

4. Last Night of the Proms – Classical music lovers rejoice! Each year in mid-September, the largest music festival ends with some good old fashioned pomp and circumstance… as well as famous songs like Land of Hope and Glory and Rule Britannia. Tickets are challenging to get, but another event is also held in Hyde Park that attracts crowds in their tens of thousands.

5. Charles I Commemoration Ceremony – Not many countries have executed their monarchs, and to their credit the UK has only executed one Charles I. To remember the event that symbolised the end of the English Civil War and Oliver Cromwell’s ascension to power, each year (on the 27th January), there is a large procession that goes from Trafalgar Square to St. James’s Palace the site of Charles’ execution. The procession is made up of volunteers from the King’s Army (English Civil War Society), all of whom are dressed up in traditional 17th century costumes.

Paul loves the travellling England and often writes about London annual events and holiday in London for tourists.